Home

Gustav Klimt, Allee im Park vor Schloß Kammer 1912. Österreichische Galerie Belvedere

The call for  papers or posters for the ESIL Vienna Conference on 4-6 September 2014 includes:

Agora 1: International Law as a Generator of National Law 

International law has greatly expanded. Today, almost all spheres of life regulated by law  are to some extent pre-determined by international law. Often international law even inspires national legislation that would otherwise possibly not exist at all. In some areas international law may substitute for domestic law. Global Law, Global Governance,  Global Administrative Law and International Public Authority discourses debate whether international law or some modification of international law is likely to make domestic law superfluous in some areas or whether it may rather generate more domestic law. This agora is intended to focus on the role of international law in the domestic sphere. What are the quantitative and qualitative features of the influence of international law at the national level? Are the traditional concepts of incorporation/application still adequate? Are states still able to mediate and control the impact of international law? Is domestic social change through international legislation possible? Is it desirable?

The deadline for proposals for papers or posters is 15 January 2014.

Gustav Klimt, Kuss, 1907/1908 Österreichische Galerie Belvedere

The call for papers and posters for the ESIL Vienna Conference on 4-6 September 2014 has been published. The programme is magnificent and you can send proposals for papers or posters until 15 January 2014.

“INTERNATIONAL LAW AND …”
Boundaries of International Law and Bridges to Other Fields and Disciplines

International law has long been influenced by other fields of law and other disciplines and this conference will explore these influences and the way that they are intertwined. International law may regulate, mostly through treaties, other fields of law such as commercial, employment, family or environmental law; the use of international law is very different in each of these fields and international lawyers may be criminal lawyers, investment arbitrators or administrative law specialists while still considering themselves international lawyers. At the same time, international law needs to be understood in a broader context. The fluctuating content of international law – as a result of its decentralized norm-making process – and the various compliance and enforcement structures – due to the lack or weakness of centralized policing institutions – often require meta-legal reasoning when it comes to explaining the normative quality of international law and to understanding what the law is and why it should be followed. These trends have increased recently and threatened international law with fragmentation through over-specialization. In order to see the whole picture, international lawyers need to understand how international law is distinguished from and linked to other fields and disciplines.
The 2014 ESIL conference in Vienna will explore these interconnections and will also look at whether the boundaries of international law have been crossed, and in what ways. The title ‘International Law and …’ indicates that the focus is both on the interplay between international law and other fields of law and between international law and other disciplines.

The papers and posters will discuss international law and history, feminism, literature, films, sports, technology, et cetera.