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I have a post commenting on this project here. It is a very interesting project, and there is plenty of time to send a proposal. Good luck, and also to Jessie and Dan with this superb project.

Dr Jessie Hohmann, QMUL, and Dr Dan Joyce, UNSW, invite contributions to an edited volume on International Law’s Objects: Emergence, Encounter and Erasure through Object and Image. The project interrogates international law’s material culture and everyday life.

The study of international law is highly text based. Whether as practice, scholarship or pedagogy, the discipline of international law both relies on and produces a wealth of written material. Cases, treaties, and volumes of academic writing are the legal sources through which most of us working in international law relate to the subject, and, at times we might come to feel that these texts are our major project and output.

Yet international law has a rich existence in the world. International law is often developed, conveyed and authorised through objects or images. From the symbolic (the regalia of the head of state and the symbols of sovereignty), to the mundane (a can of dolphin-safe tuna certified as complying with international trade standards), international legal authority can be found in the objects around us. Similarly, the practice of international law often relies on material objects or images, both as evidence (satellite images, bones of the victims of mass atrocities) and to found authority (for instance, maps and charts).

Motivating this project are three questions:

  • First, what might studying international law through objects reveal? What might objects, rather than texts, tell us about sources, recognition of states, construction of territory, law of the sea, or international human rights law?
  • Second, what might this scholarly undertaking reveal about the objects – as aims or projects – of international law? How do objects reveal, or perhaps mask, these aims, and what does this tell us about the reasons some (physical or material) objects are foregrounded, and others hidden or ignored?
  • Third, which objects will be selected? We anticipate a no doubt eclectic but illuminating collection, which points to objects made central, but also objects disclaimed, by international law. Moreover, the project will result in a fascinating artefact (itself an object) of the preoccupations of the profession at this moment in time.

Further information, including the timeline for submissions, can be found in the Call for Papers [pdf]. The Call for Papers closes 18 April 2015.

TILJNext year will be the 50th anniversary of the Texas International Law Journal (“TILJ”)! That is a truly outstanding achievement, and the editors of the TILJ have published this call for papers for the 50th anniversary issue of the Journal:

THE TEXAS INTERNATIONAL LAW JOURNAL (TILJ)

What: Call for Papers, Fifty Years of International Law Scholarship

Who: The Texas International Law Journal (“TILJ”) at The University of Texas School of Law

Deadline: Paper submissions due January 1, 2015 for publication in fall of 2015.

The Texas International Law Journal will be celebrating its 50th year in 2015. As a part of this celebration, the Journal will be publishing a special 50th Anniversary Issue as part of Volume 50.

This special issue will bridge the Journal’s storied history with its bright future. In addition to republishing a few seminal articles from its past, the Journal is seeking authors who are leaders in their respective fields of international law to comment on the most significant developments in international law over the past fifty years while also offering their perspective about the most significant developments or issues arising in the near future.

Papers may address any topic in international or comparative law, but ideally we would receive a submission in each of the following areas to provide the broadest perspective:Ÿ Treaty Law
ŸŸ; International Human Rights Law; Private International Law; Jurisdiction Ÿ; International Legal Theory.

Special topics to consider:ŸŸ International Commercial LawŸ; International Criminal Law; Law of the SeaŸŸ; Law of Armed Conflict.

Decolonization Fifty Years Later—The effects of colonization and its unwinding still reverberate around the world today, radically shaping legal institutions and defining nations’ and states’ views of the law in an international context. This topic would incorporate recent world events in the discussion.

International Justice and National Sovereignty—The international legal system imposes more regulations and guidelines than ever before. This topic examines the challenges confronted by constitutional governments, democracies, et al. with the increasing obligations imposed by international legal structures (e.g., the International Criminal Court, WTO, independent commercial arbitration agreements or treaties, etc.).

If there is an article (8,000-20,000 words), or even a brief comment (4,000-7,000 words), that you would like to publish in our special 50th Anniversary issue, we invite you to send it to submissions@tilj.org for consideration. It will be an honor to publish one of your articles in our upcoming volume. All submissions must be original, unpublished works. TILJ accepts submissions electronically via ExpressO and by e-mail at submissions@tilj.org. For more information on TILJ submission and editorial policies please see http://www.tilj.org/submissions.

ABOUT THE TEXAS INTERNATIONAL LAW JOURNAL (TILJ)

Founded in 1965, the Texas International Law Journal is a student edited and managed legal journal comprised of students of the University of Texas at Austin School of Law. The Journal seeks to advance the study, practice, and awareness of international and comparative law. TILJ (ISSN: 0163-7479) is a 501 (c)(3) organization that publishes three issues of high quality secondary source material annually and hosts scholarly symposia as well as activities and online engagement committed to promoting international legal understanding and debate.

Check out this interesting, intellectually stimulating workshop on “The Judicialization of International Relations”!

The journal International Organization and Northwestern University’s Buffett Center for International and Comparative Studies invite applications for a workshop to be held June 12-13, 2015.

Karen Alter and Erik Voeten, with the support of IO’s editorial board, will convene this workshop. Interested participants should submit a proposal of no more than 500 words by December 1, 2014 to judicializationconference@gmail.com.

We especially welcome the following types of proposals:

  • Studies that examine whether states, international institutions, firms or other nonstate actors act differently in the shadow of adjudication
  • Studies comparing politics in non-judicialized to judicialized contexts
  • Studies of the impact of judicialization across countries, regions or issue areas
  • Studies that analyze whether and when adjudicators are becoming consequential creators of international law
  • Examinations of the potential counter-responses to the increased authority of judicial institutions. For example, how and when do state actors successfully seek to influence adjudicators or otherwise reduce their jurisdiction or authority?
  • Analyses of whether international law differentially influences states depending on how much authority domestic judicial bodies have to utilize international law.
  • Inquiries into the larger theoretical implications of the emergence of these judicial actors.
  • Studies that provide generalizable insight into the practices, processes, politics and decision-making of adjudicatory bodies that have an international or transnational jurisdiction.

For more information, see: http://www.cics.northwestern.edu/groups/ioil/2015Workshop.html

SYIL
The editors of the SYbIL welcome submissions from all members of the academic community for consideration for the General Articles and Spanish Practice section of the forthcoming volume of the Yearbook. The SYbIL also welcomes references from authors in order to review their recent published books.
The SYbIL editorial process is subject to a double-blind peer review process, seeking to enhance the quality of research by providing authors with feedback on submitted materials and constructive suggestions for consideration and revision where appropriate. The review process is conducted under strict considerations of anonymity in order to ensure absolute objectivity. The editors of the SYbIL will never disclose the identities of reviewers to authors or other reviewers, nor will the editors disclose the identities of authors to the reviewers.
The Call for Papers for Vol. 18 is still open. Manuscripts dealing with any topic of interest in the field of Public and Private International Law and International relations should be submitted to the editors by 31 October 2014. The manuscripts shall compulsory conform to the Style Guide of the SYbIL (available here).Please, remember that your manuscript MUST be submitted to the Editor’s email address at editor@sybil.es. Please, do not use any other email address. Visit our website section for authors at http://www.sybil.es/sybil/for-authors/.

European Society of International Law Research Forum

Academy of European Law, European University Institute, Florence

14 – 15 May 2015

Call for Papers

The 2015 ESIL Research Forum will take place on 14 and 15 May 2015, at the European University Institute in Florence. With the transition to Annual Conferences, the Society will maintain the Research Forum in a smaller but more intensive format. The Research Forum is re-launched as a scholarly conference which promotes engagement with research in progress by members of the Society. From 2015, it will be convened at least once a year and is organized around a broad The Research Forum targets in particular scholars at an early stage of their careers, especially advanced PhD students and post-doctoral  researchers. All ESIL members are invited to attend the Research Forum as audience members.

Approximately 10-15 papers will be selected from among the submissions, and during the Research Forum paper presenters will receive comments on their papers from members of the ESIL Executive Board and invited experts.

This year, the Research Forum calls for papers addressing the following set of issues in international law:

The Use of Force

Statehood, Secession, the Creation of States

The Legitimacy and Illegitimacy of Governments and States

Territories and Boundaries

We stress that papers which address any dimensions of the call, including through interdisciplinary research and methods, and through historical, theoretical or empirical approaches, will be given serious consideration. We welcome papers that propose to redefine or re-imagine our understanding of the terms of the call and their meaning in the current Abstracts of not more than 750 words should be submitted by interested applicants to ESIL-RF2015@EUI.eu by Monday 1 December 2014. Please include the following information: name, affiliation, email address, and whether you are an ESIL member. Applicants should also send a one-page curriculum vitae with the abstract. Papers should be unpublished at the time of the presentation.

Successful applicants will be notified by email by 15 January 2015. Complete drafts of papers will be required by 15 April 2015. Following review, selected papers will be published in the ESIL SSRN Paper Series.

Successful applicants will be expected to bear the costs of their own travel and accommodation. Partial financial support may be available on a needs basis for a limited number of scholars. Scholars selected to present a paper who have exhausted other potential sources of funds can submit a request to the Selection Committee for financial support with an explanation of why they are in need of assistance.

Once selected, applicants will be informed of several hotels that offer preferential rates to Research Forum participants. Lunch on both days will be provided, and a dinner for presenters, commentators and ESIL Executive Board members will be hosted by the Academy of European Law on the evening of 14 May.

IMG_1116 copy

Interesting call for papers for a conference on “The Reform of International Economic Governance” at the University of Granada on 9-10 October 2014. The two main sessions will cover, respectively, reform of the trading regime and reform of the monetary and financial architecture. Here is the link with the information. Paper proposals may be sent until 1 June 2014.

Photo: Reflejos del Torreón (La Ahlambra, Granada, 2010)

 

Oskar Kokoschka, Die Wiener Staatsoper, 1956. Österreichische Galerie Belvedere

The call for  papers or posters for the ESIL Vienna Conference on 4-6 September 2014 includes:

Agora 7: International law and History: The Return of the Past?

International law has developed a distinctively historical and historiographic turn in the last 15 years, rediscovering a historical approach to the study of international law and international lawyers which had largely faded from view since 1945. In part it has been revitalized by a renewed preoccupation with understanding the political and normative foundations of international law, its relationship with empire and colonialism, and as part of the search for clues about the origins of the present. But it has also been revitalized by the resurgence of intellectual history, postcolonial history and international history, which are reinvigorating the study of ‘classical’ figures in international political and legal thought, and trying to understand the origins of the political, social and economic foundations of the contemporary international legal order. Along with groundbreaking work in the history of international law in general, recent years have seen new studies in the history of the laws of war, renovations of the legal thought of classical figures such as Gentili and Vattel, and new histories of international institutions such as the League of Nations.

This agora will bring together intellectual historians, historians of law and historians of international thought to consider the ways in which new research into the history of international law is changing our understanding of past and present.

 

The deadline for proposals for papers or posters is 15 January 2014.

Autumn-Tree-With-Fuchsias

The call for  papers or posters for the ESIL Vienna Conference on 4-6 September 2014 includes:

Agora 6: International law and Feminism: Anything New Under the Sun?

In the 1990s an intense debate on feminism and international law started to permeate journals and learned societies. Core concepts of international law were critiqued and de-constructed from a feminist perspective. Most recently, the ILA re-established a committee on ‘Feminism and International Law’ in 2010 focusing on the economic empowerment of women and the possible contribution of international law. Other initiatives, like the journal ‘Feminist Legal Studies’, continue; others were recently revived, such as the ‘IntLawGrrls’ blog.

Feminist methodological approaches to international law include the detection of silences in the law and the question of how to respond to the many (cultural, linguistic, religious, ethnic, economic) differences among women. Feminist international lawyers have added to the understanding of international law in various ways, e.g. through a feminist perspective on international criminal law and on women in armed conflicts.

These issues will be discussed in this agora, including questions such as: What is the current status of the debate? Is there still momentum in international law and feminism? What are the fields where international law and feminism might best contribute to the development of international law?

The deadline for proposals for papers or posters is 15 January 2014.

Stein-On-The-Danube-With-Terraced-Vineyards

The call for  papers or posters for the ESIL Vienna Conference on 4-6 September 2014 includes:

Agora 5: International Law and Literature

Law and literature has become an established research interest and has found its way into a number of law school curricula. Obviously both academic fields are primarily about the interpretation of texts. But there are many other overlaps between the two fields, from lawyers turning novelists to novelists pushing legal change. However, international law seems to have been rather on the fringe of these developments. Even so, issues central to international law have been reflected in literature (e.g. terrorism, from Joseph Conrad’s 1907 novel ‘The Secret Agent’ to the 2006 book ‘Terrorist’ by John Updike). Though more rarely, international lawyers have even become protagonists in literature like Frederic Martens in Jan Kross’ 1984 novel ‘Professor Martens’ Departure’, depicting the 19th century international lawyer already torn between apology and utopia. Conversely, international lawyers have taken a closer look at literature and studied the reflection of international law in Shakespeare’s plays like Theodor Meron in his 1994 study on ‘Henry’s Wars and Shakespeare’s Laws’ followed by his 1998 book ‘Bloody Constraint: War and Chivalry in Shakespeare’.

Building on this interest of international lawyers in literature, this agora will address general issues: Is there anything that law and literature can learn from each other? Is there a deeper overlap in the methodology? How would a lawyer cope with the prevailing subjectivist approach to art? Can writers adapt to the stringent interpretative canons of (international) lawyers? To what extent should lawyers draw on the methodology developed in the context of literary studies, e.g. as regards text analysis or interpretation?

 

The deadline for proposals for papers or posters is 15 January 2014.